NPF Investment Advisors unveils new offices in Downtown Grand Rapids

Jan 22, 2024

GRAND RAPIDS, MI – (CRAIN’S) NPF Investment Advisors, one of the longest standing privately owned investment firms in Grand Rapids, is renewing its investment in the city’s downtown with a new office in the Trust Building.

After nearly doubling its client count and assets under management in the last decade — and expanding its staff to accommodate the growth — NPF is marking its 90th anniversary in a new-yet-familiar place. The firm has taken over the entire fifth floor of the Trust Building, a significant upgrade from its previous third-floor space, which it shared with other professional offices.

NPF’s ribbon cutting welcomed community members to the new office space with partners (left to right): Dan Lupo, Chad Dutcher,
Tyler Bosgraaf and Dave Hodge.

The firm’s enduring success is a testament to the vision and values of its founding partners, who believed in active management, in-house research, local ownership and personalized advice – attributes which continue to distinguish it from many other investment firms across the city and region.

Today, NPF is led by five partners — Kurt Arvidson, Chad Dutcher, Dan Lupo, Dave Hodge and Tyler Bosgraaf — who honor the legacy of the past while evolving the firm to anticipate and adapt to changing client needs. The partners and their team work with individuals, families, businesses and endowments to grow and preserve their wealth through tailored planning, investing and coordination with other trusted service providers.

“Almost residential in feel”

The new NPF offices are designed to make both clients and team members feel more comfortable and engaged. The firm worked with local businesses and the local office of a global architecture firm to realize its vision.

“Contemporary layouts, colors and finishes make the space more open and inviting, almost residential in feel,” says Bosgraaf, an investment advisor and portfolio manager who assumed many of the responsibilities for planning and organizing the new office. “We took everything down to the studs to completely transform the space and really set it apart from our previous office.”

The kitchen space features a full refrigerator, two drawer-style microwaves, beverage fridge, dishwasher, TV, and ample storage for snacks.

The new home of NPF Investment Advisors includes 16 private offices fronted by glass walls, 20 open offices with shared working space, three conference rooms, a dedicated reception area and a spacious lounge area that flows into a kitchen and breakroom.

“The lounge feels like a living room, with soft seating and a big-screen TV,” says Bosgraaf. “It’s a great set-up for entertaining clients and encouraging informal collaborations between team members.”

Addressing staff feedback that the old space was too dark and either too hot or too cold, “We lightened the color palette and fully upgraded the HVAC system. We also widened the hallways and raised the ceilings for a more open and spacious feel. Everyone’s been pleased with the results.”

“It’s our home”

NPF Investment Advisors’ Operations Team Members.

Everyone’s also pleased with the new-old address. The partners briefly considered move-in-ready suburban locations for a new office, but sentiment clearly favored staying downtown and continuing to support the city of Grand Rapids. “This is the business and cultural hub of West Michigan, and our location here has been an important part of our identity for decades,” says Bosgraaf. “It’s our home.”

Arvidson, NPF’s chief investment officer and a 23-year veteran of the firm, says the decision to remain in the Trust Building was an easy one. “We are firmly committed to downtown Grand Rapids and the new office is a substantial long-term investment in a cohesive and interactive space for both clients and team members.”

The firm originally moved its offices to the Trust Building in the 1960s, occupying part of the sixth floor before relocating to the third floor. Completed in 1892, the Trust Building was the first structure in Grand Rapids built solely to house office space, and was the tallest building in the city at the time of its construction.

The Charlie French Conference Room, nicknamed the ‘Cozy Conference Room’, features living room style furniture for more relaxed meetings.

It was and is a fitting location for a firm with an impressive pedigree of its own. Founded in 1933 by Abbott Norris, the firm began as an investment office for a prominent local family. The client list grew and Norris was joined by Ford Perné and Charlie French in the 1950s, operating under the name Norris, Perné & French.

In 2020, the firm changed its name to NPF Investment Advisors and modernized its branding to reflect a new generation of leadership and expanded portfolio of services. The warmth and sophistication of the new office is a further expression of the brand.

Growing with Grand Rapids

Expanding office space in an era when many businesses are downsizing is also on brand for NPF. “We believe in having our team members in the office to collaborate – and always have,” says Arvidson. “Nothing beats personalized contact between clients and team members.”

Arvidson credits the firm’s guiding values for the decision to invest so heavily in the city it’s called home for 90+ years. “We greatly value our independence as a partner-owned entity and we look forward to growing with Grand Rapids in the decades to come.”

NPF Investment Advisors’ Wealth Planning team members.

NPF completed its month-long transition to the fifth floor in December, with a formal ribbon-cutting in January. A series of open houses will be held to introduce clients to the new space.

Please email us at npf@npfinvest.com or call 616-459-3421 to explore the benefits of building and preserving your wealth through tailored planning, active investing and complete coordination across your financial life.

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